Easy Way to Slash Your Risk of Parkinson's Disease by 70%

August 08, 2006
Volume 03    |   Issue 35

A team from the Harvard School of Public Health just published a study that links Parkinson's disease with chronic exposure to low doses of pesticides. They found that damage can occur as much as 10 years after exposure.

If you read my newsletter five-and-a-half years ago, you already known this. Many of my subscribers dramatically reduced their own exposure to these dangerous chemicals and lowered their risk for neurological damage.

But it's never too late to learn about the consequences of toxic chemicals and how to avoid them. If you missed this information before, use it today to make some changes in the products you use to control pests in your home and garden.

This recent study followed over 143,000 people for more than two decades. None had any symptoms of Parkinson's disease initially. And everyone who was later found to have Parkinson's had his or her diagnosis confirmed independently.

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Commercial farmers use a lot of toxic pesticides, so you might think that the people who got Parkinson's were only farmers and farm workers. Well, you'd be wrong. Everyone consistently exposed to pesticides had a 70% higher risk for getting the disease.

This isn't news to scientists. They had already discovered that common pesticides cause motor abnormalities and the destruction of brain chemicals in laboratory animals. Interestingly, exposure to other environmental toxins did not lead to Parkinson's. Just pesticides.

It's time to get rid of all toxic pesticides in your home, garage, and tool shed. But don't throw them in the garbage. They can contaminate the soil and water. Contact your local recycling center to find out how to dispose of them safely. If you're not sure which products to toss, here's a hint: All products containing toxic chemicals have warnings on their labels.

Next, buy safe products at your garden supply store and drug store. Boric acid is a safe way to kill ants. Safer Soap kills many garden pests without harming you.

Finally, you can flush pesticide residue out of your body with a good detox program.  Effective detoxifiers include the supplements NAC, alpha lipoic acid, and calcium d-glucarate.  But my favorite detoxifier by far is Dr. Isaac Eliaz' Pectasol Chelation Complex.  You can find out more about it by using this link, http://www.advancedbionutritionals.com/chelation

Your voice of reason in Women's Health,

Source:

Ascherio, A., Honglei Chen, Marc Weisskopf, Eilis O'Reilly, Marjorie McCullough, Eugenia Calle, Michael Schwartzschild, and Michael Thun. "Pesticide Exposure and Risk of Parkinson?s Disease." Annals of Neurology; July 2006; (DOI: 10.1002/ana.20904).

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